John Dodero

John Dodero

John Dodero - vessel 2

John Dodero

Dodero Studio Ceramics

During the 2020 Clayfolk Show, John will display his work by appointment at his studio:

560 S Oregon St.
Jacksonville
541-899-8285

When starting pottery in 1970 most potters were following the Asian or European tradition of design. My inspiration came from the many fine examples of Native American ceramic design. Mimbres, Sikyatki and Pre Columbian were my primary departure points. The focus has been to combine, distill and contemporize these styles and also to define the archetypes from which they evolved. The last 20 years has been spent exploring Asian motifs and finding a fusion/commonality with the west. The techniques and materials employed for surface decoration are developed to achieve a classic but natural appearance. The hope is to produce works that will not be clichés and will withstand the test of time. The Archetypes and designs in the works are meaningful to me but the viewer should derive there own meaning. I feel each piece is made for someone, I just have to wait for him or her to claim it. “I feel my work is a study and distillation of design.”

John also offers classes at his studio in Jacksonville. Please visit the following links for his Raku ,and slip casting and mold making class details.


Dodero Studio and Showroom located at:

560 S Oregon St.
Jacksonville

Open by appointment 

Contact:  

 

Call: 541-899-8285

Email: moc.liamg@12oredod

Website: http://raku-ceramic-pottery.com/

John Dodero - vessel 1
John Dodero - vessel 2
John Dodero - vessel 2
Tea Thanhbinh Duong

Tea Thanhbinh Duong

Tea Thanhbinh Duong

Junction City, OR

Tea came from Vietnam as a child and has worked as a potter in Europe, as well as in Australia and New Zealand. He uses a porcelain clay body and fires his pieces in a high fire gas kiln or in a woodfire kiln. Tea mixes his own glazes and loves to discover new forms, techniques and to push the clay as far as it will take him.


Contact

Phone: 541-510-2334

Tea Thanhbinh Duong - vessel
Tea Thanhbinh Duong - vase

Nina Fernstrom-Duong

Nina Fernstrom-Duong

Nina Fernstrom-Duong - Hanging Fishes

Nina Fernstrom-Duong

Raku Fish

Nina came to Oregon from Sweden and she loves to create funny personalities and characters in the pottery fish. They are hand thrown on a pottery wheel and Raku fired. Because of the opportunity for variation in Raku pottery, each personally signed ceramic fish ornament is unique.

You can find Nina’s fish in select galleries across the US.


Contact:

Email | Website

Nina Fernstrom-Duong - Fishes
Frank Gosar

Frank Gosar

Frank Gosar - crockpot

Frank A. Gosar

Off-Center Ceramics

Whimsical and functional stoneware pottery: wheel-thrown, hand-painted with ceramic minerals and stains using hand-made brushes, and fired to cone 10 in reduction.

Please visit our website for current gallery and show locations.


Contact:

Email | Website

Click on images to enlarge

Frank Gosar - Jars
Carole Hayne

Carole Hayne

Carole Hayne

Firesong Ceramics

I was born in Southern Oregon when trees covered most of the land. Trees have provided the inspiration for most of my artwork whether it was oil paints, watercolors, or pen and ink drawings. Now they inform my pottery.  Now and then, one can see a touch of geometric precision in a series of pieces. influenced by my study of physics and mathematics. The math and science in my background has helped in glaze formulation.

 

My future husband introduced me to pottery in 1990.  Soon I was developing glazes to set off his pottery and dabbling in creating my own artistic pieces.  Starting in 2006, I began showing and selling my own creations.  I introduce a new collection every several years.  My first successful line was the Spring Reeds which feature sprigged grasses.  This morphed into a line of modern geometric shapes that stood cubes on a vertex to make a vase.  A workshop last fall turned the cubes back on a side and into lidded boxes with inlaid patterns.  My latest series is the Madrone grove collection featuring the negative space between Madrone tree trunks.

My shop on Etsy is called Firesong Pottery.

My website and online store: firesongpottery.com

My email: moc.yrettopgnoserif@elorac

I am also part of the OPA’s Showcase Show and Sale in Portland the last week in April.

Click on images below to enlarge and view full screen.

Annie Heron

Annie Heron

Annie Heron

I began working with clay in my forties, and felt like I finally knew what I wanted to do when I grew up! I’m still working on it (clay, and growing up), and enjoying the journey. There is always more to learn and discover in this ancient art. I had the opportunity to teach ceramics in a high school, and still enjoy sharing with others of all ages the delight I find in ceramics.

My work ranges from traditional, wheel-thrown tableware, to heavily textured, handbuilt whimsy. I also make tiles and a form I call tile collage, which combines tile and mosaic in a repurposed frame.


Contact:

Email | Website

 

Annie Heron
Annie Heron
Annie Heron - mugs
Annie Heron - mugs
Annie Heron - mugs
Annie Heron - mugs
Roxanne Hunnicutt

Roxanne Hunnicutt

Click on images to enlarge.
Roxanne Hunnicutt
Roxanne Hunnicutt - plate 2
Roxanne Hunnicutt - plate 3

Roxanne Hunnicutt

Laughing Waters Pottery

Although making utilitarian pottery has been my consuming interest for fifty years, like many artists, I have worked in related fields to support my passion. For years I taught art and other subjects in public schools. After receiving a B.A and lifetime teaching credential from California State University in Sacramento, I have taught, lived and made pottery in California, Colorado, and Oregon. My major was art, with a large part of that study in art history. I added a Master’s degree in Education from Southern Oregon University in Ashland recently.

Laughing Waters Pottery in Grants Pass is my studio in a small room and garage. Pottery equipment (a pottery wheel, kilns, slab table, extruder, pug mill and lots of clay) has taken over the room, the garage and spread to the yard. It is quite a sight, much more interesting that the Better Homes and Gardens version of a beautiful yard. At least to a potter it is heavenly.

Ross, my husband, now makes his own pieces and smoke fires our big decorative platters, which is a primitive firing method he carries out in a barrel using just Oregon hard woods.

Also some of our new work is sculptural, both figurative and non representational. I love to find new areas of pottery and try them. Welding classes allowed for added metal in some of my sculptures.

In 1977 I made and sold quite a few $10 cups, financing a month’s trip into eight countries in Europe with high school students. There and in Washington DC I saw work that has continued to influence my designs. I continue to visit museums and collections whenever I can.

Outside my pottery business, I still tutor, working for local public school districts. I now enjoy working with students who do not prosper in the regular classrooms or have been excluded from regular classrooms. One-on-one, these students are just wonderful people who I genuinely love to teach and know.

I also attend regular meetings of pottery groups and workshops. I keep learning and practicing. I hope those efforts and my love of all pottery shows in my work.


Contact:

Email | Website

 

Bob Johnson

Bob Johnson

Bob Johnson - Plate
Robert Johnson - Vase

Bob Johnson

Psychoceramics

I love what fire can do to clay. And I love working with natural materials, especially wood ash. The drippy, runny effects, as well as the beading of some of the glazes on many of my pots come from wood ash, used as a flux to melt the glaze. (The trick is to make the glaze fluid—but keep it on the pot at 2230 degrees or more.) I often enhance effect with textured slip (a runny, wet clay) applied to the surface. All the pots you see here are made of white stoneware and fired in a gas kiln.

 

My studio is beside the North Umpqua River, near Roseburg, Oregon. Before becoming a potter, I was a psychologist, for nearly three decades, at Umpqua Community College—which explains the name of my pottery business: Psychoceramics.


Contact:

Email | Website

Click on images to enlarge.

Robert Johnson - Vase
Robert Johnson - Mug
Robert Johnson - Lantern
Cheryl Kempner

Cheryl Kempner

Click on images to enlarge.

Cheryl Kempner

Kemper Clay

For the 2020 Clayfolk Show and Sale, Cheryl will be displaying her works, along with Bonnie Morgan, Lorene Senesac, and Marydee Bombick at Ashland Art Works on Oak Street:

I have been creating in clay for over two decades. My explorations started with a beginning throwing class in Colorado, then to mixing clay and glazes at a community college in Kansas, to independent clay studies in Oregon, and finally to a beautiful studio in Ashland, Oregon. It amazes me how new ideas continue to flow into my head and hands. My signature pieces for many years were very thin hand-built porcelain vessels edged in 24k gold. My mother’s wooden rolling pin was often used to roll a lace texture into the porcelain. I love the balance of the delicate beauty and the inherent strength of these pieces.

Two years ago my worked changed dramatically. Our daughter turned 27 in intensive care after surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. Once I got back to my studio, whimsical shapes, thick clay, and primary colored glazes started to appear. My hands took over and created crazy, nonrealistic birds. These birds looked up at me with funny little beaks and funny little eyes – they made me smile. Our daughter continues her recovery and the birds continue to evolve. There are now clay birds sitting on rocks, birds in clay bird houses, birds in nests, and birds on clay window sills. The whimsy of these creations has helped balance the intensity of life.


Contact:

Website | Email

Jon King

Jon King

Jon King - vase

 Jon King


Contact:

Email | Phone: 541-224-4156

 

Jon King - vase 2

Click images to enlarge